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09 March 2018 at 10:14 BST

Hogan Lovells partners exit to set up Baker McKenzie LA office

The team join from a range of sectors including consumer goods and retail, TMT and healthcare.

David McShane

Baker McKenzie is launching an office in Los Angeles after hiring five partners from Hogan Lovells US. The five join from a range of sectors including TMT, technology and consumer and retail. Robin Samuel, Barry Thompson and Joe Ward are founding partners in Los Angeles and Mark Goodman and Ethan Miller will operate out of the firm's San Francisco / Palo Alto office. Colin Murray, North American managing partner for Baker McKenzie, said: 'Our new Partners will take on significant commercial and employment litigation as well as class action cases for clients across multiple industries. We are delighted that they have chosen Baker McKenzie, and that we will be able to provide these services to our Southern California clients.' Mr Murray added: 'Given our growing presence on the West Coast, and the fact that we already had attorney teams living and working in Southern California, we are solidifying our roots in a market  where many California-based Fortune 500 companies have a presence. Los Angeles is also an increasingly important gateway for our clients in Asia.' 

Recognised leaders

Michael Wagner, Baker McKenzie's North American chair and global executive member, said: 'We are thrilled to bring on board such terrific talent, experience and capabilities to strengthen the depth of our offerings to our clients, particularly in the Consumer Goods & Retail, Healthcare, and Technology, Media and Telecommunications sectors. Our new Partners are recognised leaders in their fields, which further enhances our reputation in California and across North America.'

 
   
 
 
 

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