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14 February 2017 at 10:00 BST

IBA lashes Trump for undermining US judiciary and rule of law

The International Bar Association has publicly called on President Donald Trump to stop undermining the United States judiciary. - and consequently the rule of law - through personal attacks on respected jurists.

Paul Hakimata

The IBA has publically called on President Donald Trump to stop undermining the United States judiciary. – and consequently the rule of law – through personal attacks on respected jurists.

Following the unanimous decision of the judges of the US Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, in San Francisco, not to reinstate the President’s recently issued Executive Order which bans nationals travelling to the US from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen – the IBA issued a statement cautioning the President against further diminishing public confidence in the vital institution of an impartial and independent judiciary.

President should not be above the law

IBA President Martin Šolc said: The rule of law, the centuries-old legal principle that law should govern a nation, is something that is being chipped away at each time President Trump publicly attacks and disrespects a judge. Not only is this demoralising for the individual who is the target of the contempt, but also more widely it damages public confidence in the judicial system.

‘For all the President’s statements opposing elitism, he needs to remember not to attempt to place himself above the law.’

Seven executive orders since taking office

Between taking office on 20 January 2017 and 30 January 2017 President Trump has issued seven Executive Orders.

Supporting the independence of the judiciary and the right of lawyers to practice their profession without interference is one of the three core objectives of the IBA.

 
   
 
 
 

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