16 Sep 2022

KCs commemorate Queen's 'steadfast and true public service'

Procession from the Old Bailey to Gray's Inn Chapel was led by Criminal Bar Association chair Kirsty Brimelow KC

(l-r) Laurie-Anne Power KC (treasurer), Kirsty Brimelow KC (chair) and Tana Adkin KC (vice chair) James Rossiter

Dozens of judges and barristers took part in a procession from the Old Bailey to Gray’s Inn Road this week to mark the death of Queen Elizabeth II. 

The procession of King’s Counsel and junior barristers, which was organised by the Criminal Bar Association (CBA), culminated in the laying of a wreath in tribute to the late Queen at Gray’s Inn Chapel on Thursday afternoon. 

The group, dressed in robes and mourning attire, was led by Kirsty Brimelow KC, chair of the CBA, alongside vice chair Tana Adkin KC and treasurer Laurie-Anne Power KC. Brimelow laid a wreath near the chapel entrance and led the group in a minute of silence.

A note accompanying the wreath said: ‘The Criminal Bar Association joins with legal professions across the Commonwealth in mourning the passing of Queen Elizabeth II. We pay tribute to the Queen’s steadfast and true public service and offer our deep condolences to His Majesty the King and the Royal Family. We mark with sorrow and dedication to justice the change of Queen’s Counsel to King’s Counsel.’

The change of post-nominals from QC to KC was one that immediately went into effect when the Queen’s death was announced on 8 September. 

In tribute, Mark Fenhalls KC, chair of the Bar Council of England & Wales, said last week: “Throughout a long, loyal and steadfast reign, Queen Elizabeth II embodied the symbolic role of the figure in whose name justice is carried out with great integrity.”

Courts are remaining open during the official nine-day mourning period other than on Monday 19 September for the Queen’s funeral, which will be a National Day of Mourning and a public holiday. 

During this period, the CBA has suspended demonstrations over ongoing strike action. However, members will continue to refuse to accept instructions or to attend court.

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