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20 November 2018 at 14:36 BST

Deloitte Legal latest of Big 4 in forging Singapore tie-ups

Deloitte Legal joins competitors PwC and EY in boosting Asia presence with latest local addition to its network Singapore's Sabara Law.

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Deloitte Legal has added a Singapore legal practice to its network of over 2,400 law professionals in more than 80 countries to beef up its regional capabilities.

Complementary offering

The practice's focus is considered to be complementary to Deloitte's international multi-disciplinary teams, and will focus on advising clients in data protection, financial services regulatory and commercial law, mergers and acquisitions, employment law and legal management consulting. Sabara Law will also work with Deloitte Legal International, the licensed foreign law practice launched in August, to offer full international legal services using Singapore as a regional hub to serve clients in South-east Asia. Sabara Law managing director Yeoh Lian Chuan, formerly of the Monetary Authority of Singapore, said ‘my colleagues and I are excited to join the Deloitte Legal network, and to work closely with many other Deloitte professionals.

Joining the competition

Mr Chuan explained, ‘the legal industry is also at an inflection point of sorts, and I look forward to tapping into Deloitte's extensive experience in areas such as technology and process optimisation to service both traditional and new emerging legal needs differently.’ Deloitte joins competitors PwC and EY in forging tie-ups with law firms to extend their services in the island state. Recently, Rachel Eng left her position of deputy chairman of WongPartnership to set up her firm Eng and Co as part of PwC's global legal network. While EY added Atlas Asia Law Corporation to its global network when Dentons Rodyk & Davidson's former senior partner Evelyn Ang started the law practice.

 
   
 
 
 

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